Tuesday, September 19, 2006

Xgl is cool but it takes more than that

I normally run Windows Vista RC1 x64 but recently decided it was time for my semi-annual Linux test.  This is where I install the latest released version of a popular Linux distro and attempt to use it for as long as I can stand.  The idea of a free (as in speech) desktop is appealing but it's a non-starter if it holds me back in any way.  Remember I said that I normally run Windows so I am referring to holding me back in any way that I'm not used to.

Anyway, the candidate was Ubuntu 6.06 and I only used it for a few hours.  Two of those hours were spent trying to get my dual-screen setup working.  Another hour was spent getting Skype to work (it did work but I had to google for several posts and then force install some packages).  Evolution crashed every time it exited.  My USB headphone worked but only after I logged out and back in.  Even then I could not get my main speakers and the USB headphones to work at the same time.  I was not able to play any of my ripped music, which is encoded to either MP3 or WMA (yes I know there are solutions for this but by this time I had lost interest).

Lately we've heard alot about XGL and all of it's eye candy.  Larry recently blogged on this and posted a link to the shell team's blog.  This post specifically talks about there not being "floppy" windows in Vista.  While including links to some cool demos from 2003, the gist of the post is that while wobbling  your windows is technically possible, it might not be the right thing for the shipping product.  The point is made that Microsoft has issues to consider that a Linux vendor can't possibly imagine.  The videos in the link clearly show that technically Microsoft has everything they need to shake, rattle, and roll Windows anyway you want.  I also think Larry is right that we will likely see DWM hacks for Vista that add wobbly windows and all sorts of other goodies.

ESR recently suggested that the Linux community needs to make compromises in order to more directly challlenge the Microsoft monopoly.  He's right.  The gap is widening and wobbly windows is not nearly enough to close it.

21 comments:

  1. busby seo test caseJanuary 16, 2009 at 8:01 PM

    i just know about this

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  2. Xgl is an X server architecture designed to take advantage of modern graphics cards via their OpenGL drivers, layered on top of OpenGL via glitz. It supports hardware acceleration of all X, OpenGL and XVideo applications and graphical effects by a compositing window manager such as Compiz or Beryl. The project was started by David Reveman of Novell and first released on January 2, 2006. It was finally removed [1] from the X server in favor of AIGLX on June 12, 2008.

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  3. Ubuntu, which has become one of the world's most popular Linux distributions in recent years, launched its latest version on June 1 following months of intense testing. The new release is titled Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Long Term Support), and has a specific emphasis on the needs of large organisations with both desktop and server versions.

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  4. Xgl is a new Xserver architecture layered on top of OpenGL. Xgl can perform intricate graphical operations--such as rendering antialiased fonts--noticeably faster than other available Xservers that do not use OpenGL. The current implementation is Xglx but the future implementation of Xgl will be Xegl.

    Cheers,

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  5. chartered yacht greeceFebruary 15, 2009 at 6:48 AM

    Under the leadership of David Reveman, Novell has sponsored and led the development of this powerful new graphics subsystem for Linux since late 2004. Xgl is the X server architecture layered on top of OpenGL that takes advantage of available accelerated 3-D rendering hardware. It is designed to integrate well with the composite extension and performs best when a compositing manager is running. Compiz, the new OpenGL compositing manager from Novell, is the framework that enables the development of graphical plug-ins.

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  6. I just installed xgl and it's cool. Is there a guide or something that describes how to edit all the options, e.g. number of sides to the 'cube', the different keyboard shortcuts, etc.
    I need an instruction manual!!!

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  7. "Remember I said that I normally run Windows so I am referring to holding me back in any way that I'm not used to."

    Hahaha, thats pretty funny. I admire your 'attempts' at running Linux. One day your 'semi annual' attempt will succeed!... maybe..

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  8. Custom Research PaperMarch 21, 2009 at 11:53 AM

    Xgl running on Compiz gives SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop enhancements that open up a whole world of hardware acceleration, fancy animation, separating hardware resolution from software resolution, and more. As a result, Linux desktops will become more usable, end-user productivity will increase, and Linux is firmly positioned at the forefront of client computing technology.

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  9. eczema treatmentApril 3, 2009 at 4:05 PM

    Xgl is an X server architecture layered on top of OpenGL. It is at an early stage in development and a number of important pieces are still missing. Xglx is the only server currently available that uses this architecture. It requires an already existing X server, and is only intended for testing and development.

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  10. yachtcharter griechenlandApril 15, 2009 at 3:44 PM

    That's great, I never thought about Xgl is cool but it takes more than thatlike that before.

    ReplyDelete
  11. yacht charter greeceApril 15, 2009 at 3:45 PM

    Good post, but have you thought about Xgl is cool but it takes more than that before?

    ReplyDelete
  12. Back in 1987, XGL were one of the first companies to be developing GUI software before Windows became popular and our first GUI systems ran in DOS! From an early idea, came successful patent applications and then the development of XGL Hypertext VOYAGER followed by the VOYAGER range of products, now under the family title VOYAGER INFORMATION SYSTEMS.

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  13. XGL is a version of the X server built on top of the OpenGL API. Many developers see the XGL approach as the way forward; as video hardware becomes increasingly 3D-only, OpenGL offers a uniform way to drive that hardware. Once an XGL server becomes available, the door will be opened for all kinds of fast 2D and 3D applications

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  14. It is designed to integrate well with the composite extension and performs best when a compositing manager is running. Xgl can perform intricate graphical operations--such as rendering antialiased fonts--noticeably faster than other available Xservers that do not use OpenGL.

    ReplyDelete
  15. “yachtcharter griechenland”May 10, 2009 at 12:20 PM

    That's great, I never thought about Xgl is cool but it takes more than that like that before.

    ReplyDelete
  16. “Yacht charter Greece”May 10, 2009 at 12:20 PM

    That's great, I never thought about Xgl is cool but it takes more than that like that before.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Loan Workout specialistMay 27, 2009 at 12:15 PM

    I was just thinking about Xgl is cool but it takes more than that and you've really helped out. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Modify Loan RateMay 27, 2009 at 12:15 PM

    Good post, but have you thought about Xgl is cool but it takes more than that before?

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete